Friday, September 30, 2011

Suzumiya Haruhi [melancholy of haruhi suzumiya]

Haruhi Suzumiya (涼宮ハルヒ Suzumiya Haruhi?) is the general name for a series of light novels written by Nagaru Tanigawa and illustrated by Noizi Itowhich were subsequently adapted into other media. The story follows the title character Haruhi Suzumiya, a high school girl who can unconsciously change reality, and her strange antics with her school club, the SOS Brigade, which she founded to investigate mysterious events. Haruhi forcibly drafts her cynical classmate Kyon, who narrates the series, and similarly recruits three additional members into her club: the silent bibliophile Yuki Nagato, the shy and timidMikuru Asahina, and the friendly transfer student Itsuki Koizumi. These members soon reveal themselves to Kyon as the extraordinary characters Haruhi is seeking, sent by their various organizations to observe her and hold her reality warping powers in check by maintaining the illusion of a normal life.

The first novel was published in Japan on June 6, 2003 by Kadokawa Shoten with nine individual novels published and a planned tenth as of April 1, 2007. The light novels have been adapted into four separate manga series, a television anime adaptation, two original net animations, an animated film and severalvideo games. After the anime adaptation aired in 2006, publishing company Kadokawa Shoten received various offers for licensing both the novels and their various adaptations.[1][2]

The novels are licensed for English language release in the United States by Little, Brown and Company, for young readers by Yen Press and the anime adaptation was licensed for North American distribution by Kadokawa Pictures USA division which then sublicensed production and distribution to Bandai Entertainment.


Kadokawa Shoten published two manga adaptations of the Haruhi Suzumiya light novel series in Shōnen Ace. The first one, by Makoto Mizuno, ran from May to December 2004 and was considerably different from the light novels in its one published volume, having little input from the original author. The second series, illustrated by Gaku Tsugano, started in November 2005 and is still in production, having been published in eight volumes, though with a younger target audience than the original novels. On April 17, 2008 Yen Press announced that they had acquired the license for the North American release of the first four volumes of the second manga series, promising the manga would not be censored.[4]

An official parody four-panel comic strip titled The Melancholy of Haruhi-chan Suzumiya by Puyo started serialization in Shōnen Ace on July 26, 2007 and inThe Sneaker on August 30, 2007. The first bound volume was released on May 26, 2008, the second on December 26, 2008, and the third on July 10, 2009. Yen Press licensed the Haruhi-chan manga series for an English release in North America[5] and released the first volume on October 26, 2010.[6]Another four-panel parody manga, Nyorōn Churuya-san by Eretto (Utsura Uraraka), was originally a dōjinshi starring a smoked cheese-loving, super deformed version of Tsuruya, published in three volumes (released on August 2006, February 2007, and October 2007) before beginning serialization in the magazine Comp Ace in November 2008.[7][8] Another manga, The Vanishing of Nagato Yuki chan (長門有希ちゃんの消失 Nagato Yuki-chan no Shōshitsu?), also by Puyo, started serialization in Kadokawa Shoten's Young Ace in July 2009. It is set in the alternate timeline established in the fourth light novel, The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya, where Yuki Nagato is a shy schoolgirl as opposed to an alien.[9]


The anime adaptation of The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya (涼宮ハルヒの憂鬱 Suzumiya Haruhi no Yūutsu?), produced by the Japanese animation studioKyoto Animation and directed by Tatsuya Ishihara, contained 14 episodes which aired in Japan between April 2 and July 2, 2006. It was originally aired in anonlinear order, with the prologue and first seven chapters of the first novel intermixed with chapters from some of the later novels. The "next episode" previews feature two different episode numberings: one number from Haruhi, who numbers the episodes in chronological order, and one number from Kyon, who numbers them in broadcast order. The DVD releases start with "Episode 00" and are then shown in chronological order. The anime was licensed and distributed by Bandai Entertainment over four DVDs released between May and November 2007. A complete box set was later released on July 29, 2008.

The second season of the anime series was announced in a full-page advertisement of Asahi Shimbun on July 7, 2007 in Japan.[10] Promotional videos included a live action sequence, inspired by the "Bamboo Leaf Rhapsody" chapter from the third novel The Boredom of Haruhi Suzumiya, depicting Haruhi and Kyon breaking into a school with footage taken from surveillance cameras. On December 18, 2007 the anime's official website,, was replaced by a fake 404 error with five form-input fields, a reference to the pivotal date in The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya, the fourth volume in the light novel series.[11]

A re-broadcast of the first series began in April 2009.[12] Following a comment by Teletama one of the broadcasting stations, that the 2009 broadcast would be 28 episodes long, there was speculation that the re-broadcast would be followed by the second season, though this was not confirmed by Kadokawa at the time.[13][14] The first new episode, "Bamboo Leaf Rhapsody" (笹の葉ラプソディ Sasa no Ha Rapusodi?), was aired on May 21, 2009 as the eighth episode of the re-broadcast. The re-broadcast also aired on 7mate in 2011. [15] Unlike the original run the re-broadcast was shown in chronological order, with new episodes intermixed with the old ones. Episodes were later shown on Kadokawa's YouTube channel after the broadcast, and also started showing English-subtitled episodes. Bandai Entertainment licensed the re-broadcast in 2010[16] and released a complete collection in North America on September 14, 2010.[17] Manga Entertainment will release the season in a 4-disc DVD box set, including the Haruhi-chan mini-episodes, in the UK on July 4, 2011.[18]


Kuroshitsuji [black butler]

Black Butler (黒執事 Kuroshitsuji?) is a manga written and illustrated by Yana Toboso. Since its debut on September 16, 2006, it has been serialized inSquare Enix's shōnen manga magazine Monthly GFantasy.

The series follows Sebastian Michaelis, a demonic butler who is bound by a supernatural contract to serve Ciel Phantomhive, the twelve-year-old head of the Phantomhive noble family and the business-savvy owner of the Funtom company, a toy manufacturer. In return, when Ciel has finished all of his tasks, including avenging his parents' deaths, Sebastian will be allowed to kill him and take his soul. It was announced in July 2008 that an anime adaption, directed by Shinohara Toshiya and produced by A-1 Pictures, was expected. It premiered in October 2008, and has since ended with 24 episodes. The second season aired in 2010 spanning 12 episodes with two new main characters, Alois Trancy and Claude Faustus. The series has been licensed by Yen Press in North America and published in Yen Plus' August 2009 issue for the magazine's first anniversary.


In a manor house on the outskirts of Victorian era London, butler Sebastian Michaelis serves Lord Earl Ciel Phantomhive, the orphaned twelve-year-old head of an English noble family and a toy and candy empire, who serves directly under the Queen as her "guard dog". Sebastian carries out any task required by his master while solving the problems plaguing England with ease and perfection, because of his demonic lineage and Faustian contract with his master. The parents of Master Phantomhive estate were murdered when Ciel was younger. As a result, he made a deal with a demon asking for vengeance upon those who had disgraced him, and the Phantomhive name, in exchange for his soul.

Written and drawn by Yana Toboso, the chapters of Black Butler have been serialized in the shōnen manga magazine Monthly GFantasy since its debut in the October 2006 issue.[1] The chapters are also published in collected volumes by Square Enix. The first volume was released on February 27, 2007 and as of November 27, 2009, eight volumes have been released so far.[2] Yen Press licensed the series for an English language release and serialized the manga in Yen Plus' August 2009 issue for the magazine's first anniversary.[3] The publisher released the first volume in January 2010.[4] French publisherKana licensed the series in under the Dark Kana imprint as Black Butler. The publisher released the first volume in November 2009.[5] Carlsen Comics has licensed the series in Germany as Black Butler, the same title used for the French and English releases. The second volume was released in May 2010.[6]On October 31, 2010 Italian publisher Planet Manga announced the licensing of the series. The first volume was released on April 28, 2011.[dated info][7]


Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Majikano [magikano]

Magikano (マジカノ Majikano?) is a manga series by Takeaki Momose, which was later adapted into an anime series, directed by Seiji Kishi and written byHideki Mitsui.

The anime series was also broadcast by Animax, who adapted and dubbed the series into English for broadcast across its English language networks inSoutheast Asia and South Asia from February 2007, where the series received its English language premiere.

ADV Films has licensed the rights for the North American release of Magikano on DVD, and released the first volume on December 4, 2007.[1] ADV Films'Anime Network began airing the anime on January 3, 2008 on their Subscription On Demand platform.[2] On March 6, 2008 the anime began airing on their Free On Demand platform. In July 2008, the series became one of over 30 ADV titles to be transferred to Funimation.[3]


Ayumi Mamiya is a witch cursed to lose her powers but there is one boy who can break the spell and save her. Haruo Yoshikawa thinks he is a normal boy but unknown to him his three sisters are witches who use their magical powers to keep him protected and ignorant about the existence of magic. Now Ayumi must wake up Haruo's latent powers to save herself but his sisters will have none of that.


Saturday, September 24, 2011

Aishīrudo Nijūichi [eyeshield 21]

Eyeshield 21 (アイシールド21 Aishīrudo Nijūichi?) is a manga about American football written by Riichiro Inagaki and illustrated by Yusuke Murata. It has been adapted into an anime movie in 2004 (shown at Jump Festa), an anime television series in 2005, several video games and a trading card game from Konami. The manga is serialized in Shueisha's Weekly Shōnen Jump. The manga is published in English by Viz Media.[1]

The anime version, produced by NAS and animated by Studio Gallop, premiered across Japan on TV Tokyo from April 6, 2005, and ended March 19, 2008 with episode 145. The anime is sponsored by NFL Japan. The English dub aired on the free on-demand Toonami Jetstream as a joint effort with NFL Rush on December 17, 2007,[2] but no more episodes will be dubbed, as the deal with NFL Rush fell through in 2008.[citation needed] It has subsequently been picked up for broadcast on Crunchyroll in a subtitled format. It is also aired in Singapore, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Philippines and South Korea.


The plot of Eyeshield 21 revolves around a weak and non-assertive boy named Sena Kobayakawa who enters the high school of his choice, Deimon Private Senior High School, where his childhood friend Mamori Anezaki attended school the year before. His only remarkable physical abilities are his running speed and intense agility, the result of a school life spent complying with the demands of bullies. It was revealed later that a friend, Riku, taught him how to run fast to help him against bullies. His abilities quickly catch the eye of the high school's American football team captain Yoichi Hiruma, who forces Sena to join the Deimon Devil Bats as its running back.

To protect his identity to prevent other teams in the school from recruit him for his speed, Sena is forced to publicly assume the role of team manager and enter the field wearing a helmet equipped with a green-tinted eyeshield in order to hide his features under the pseudonym of "Eyeshield 21". The makeshift team initially takes part in the spring football tournament hoping to win with through the strength of their new "secret weapon." However, the extremely weak team is eliminated early on by the Ojo White Knights, a powerhouse football team that focuses on defense.

After Deimon's defeat, the spring tournament is revealed as secondary in importance to the fall tournament, where the teams compete for the chance to play in the "Christmas Bowl", the high school football league championship. Hiruma, Kurita, and Sena regroup and slowly build a real team from other misfits and students looking to define themselves, such as Tarō Raimon, a baseball player who can only catch, and the Ha-Ha Brothers. Other characters slowly join the team, and the series follows the building and growth of the Deimon Devil Bats and its members as well as various rival teams as they all strive to achieve their goal of playing in the Christmas Bowl.

Following the Christmas Bowl, Japan begins to gather the best football players to form a team that will represent Japan at the American Football Youth World Championship, where an MVP will be rewarded an NFL contract and $3 million. Team Japan manages to make it to the final against Team America. The result is that a final touchdown by Sena at the buzzer ties the score, and both teams are declared winners, since no one expected anyone to win against America; however, the two teams are unsatisfied with this and tear straight back onto the field for their own improvised "overtime," causing chaos with officials. It is unclear which teams won the unofficial extra period but Panther of Team America won the MVP trophy aloft, winning the pro contract with the San Antonio Armadillos.

The series concludes with Sena becoming the captain of the Devil Bats when Hiruma and Kurita go off to college. In his final year of high school, Sena is invited to Notre Dame High School by Clifford, therefore fulfilling Hiruma's proclamation at the beginning of the series: the famous Eyeshield 21 of Notre Dame High has been born. All of the main characters are shown in the final chapter to be in college or playing amateur-league football while maintaining a job.


Eyeshield 21 has been collected into more than 35 tankōbon; spanning 333 chapters, or 'Downs', they were all numbered until the final episode, which was named 'Touch Down'. The series totals 37 volumes when fully collected into tankōbon form, the final volume having been published October 2009. The story within the manga continues past the end of the anime, which ended after the D-Bats' Kantou semi-final against Oujou. Eyeshield 21 has been published in the U.S. by Viz Media under the Shonen Jump Advanced lab

Eyeshield 21 began airing in Japan on April 6, 2005, with its last episode broadcast on March 19, 2008. It played a total of 145 episodes with two OVAS. The English dub aired on the free on-demand Toonami Jetstream as a joint effort with NFL Rush on December 17, 2007,[2] but was dropped before its completion. In December 2008, the video streaming service Crunchyroll announced that they would begin to stream Eyeshield 21 on their site on January 2, 2009 by offering the first eight episodes for free while providing a Higher quality ad-free version for paid members.[4] As of November 2009, all 145 English subtitled episodes have been uploaded to Crunchyroll website. The English subtitles and translation is produced by MX Media LLC [5] On February 26, 2010, Section23 Films had announced that Sentai Filmworks has received the license to the anime and will be released on subtitled-only DVD, May 18, 2010.[6]